AFGE Local 704’s Letter to the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee

February 2, 2016, Letter to the Honorable Jason Chaffetz

Attachments

EPA Deflects Blame as It’s Accused of Massive Failures in Flint’s Water Crisis

EPA Deflects Blame as It’s Accused of Massive Failures in Flint’s Water Crisis

By Eric Katz 2:00 PM ET

 

Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Mich., testifies at the hearing.

Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Mich., testifies at the hearing. Molly Riley/AP

The Environmental Protection Agency faced harsh criticism at a congressional hearing Wednesday from lawmakers and activists for not taking more aggressive action to combat the spread of contaminated water in Flint, Mich., though the agency itself pointed the finger primarily at state and local officials

Lawmakers promised a whole of government response to the crisis of lead-contaminated water, calling for federal agencies to join in the state’s response to alleviating the situation and accountability for those who allowed it to unfold. Members of both parties criticized the Environmental Protection Agency for not taking a more active role once unsafe levels of lead were detected, but Democrats on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee stressed the failure laid primarily with the state government of Michigan. Their Republican counterparts were more willing to spread the blame around.“This is not a natural disaster, it’s a human disaster,” said Rep. Tim Walberg, R-Mich. It was “brought on by failure of government at all levels.”

“This is not a natural disaster, it’s a human disaster,” said Rep. Tim Walberg, R-Mich. It was “brought on by failure of government at all levels.”

Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Mich., who represents Flint, said the EPA should have done more to make data public. But placing blame on the federal agency amounts to a “false equivalency,” he said. “I want to hold the EPA accountable,” Kildee said, “but let’s make sure we have the facts right.” He added that the state’s Environmental Quality Department lied to the EPA about having corrosion control in place.

“I want to hold the EPA accountable,” Kildee said, “but let’s make sure we have the facts right.” He added that the state’s Environmental Quality Department lied to the EPA about having corrosion control in place.

The EPA has come under fire for failing to disclose a June internal memorandum by one of its drinking water experts — Miguel Del Toral — that found unsafe levels of contamination in Flint’s drinking water. Marc Edwards, a drinking water expert and professor at Virginia Tech, told the committee the EPA was “unworthy of the public trust.”

Edwards also accused EPA of retaliating against Del Toral for speaking out on Flint’s contaminated water. EPA “employees causing trouble by doing their jobs are not allowed to do their jobs,” he said.

The oversight committee held a hearing in July looking into mismanagement — including whistleblower retaliation — at the same EPA region (Region 5) accused of hiding its findings on Flint’s water. The head of that region, Susan Hedman, resigned on Monday. The committee issued a subpoena to require Hedman’s testimony. John J. O’Grady, president of the American Federation of Government Employees’ local that represents the EPA’s Region 5 workforce, wrote in a letter to the committee ahead of the hearing that the current crisis is “an example of politics and protocol at its worse.”

“It is a sad point in the history of the U.S. EPA that rather than being an agency Americans can count on to protect them, it has not,” O’Grady said.

EPA officials said the agency is taking steps to address the crisis in a transparent way, noting officials have already deployed an EPA Flint Task Force. That group includes response personnel, scientists, water quality experts, community involvement coordinators and support staff. On Jan. 21, EPA issued an emergency order to the state and local government with specifications to bring the drinking water system in compliance with regulations. Joel Beauvais, acting Deputy Assistant Administrator at EPA’s Office of Water, told the committee the agency is working on providing the first meaningful, long-term update to the Lead and Copper Rule in 25 years.

Beauvais acknowledged EPA bore some culpability, but noted it was the state of Michigan that made the decision to switch Flint’s water supply to the Flint River.

“Everyone should’ve done everything humanly possible to avoid this,” he said. “But I do think it’s important to remember how we got into this situation.” The EPA inspector general announced last month it would conduct an investigation into the Flint water contamination, and the agency has promised to deliver to the committee more documents related to the crisis by the end of the week.

\Committee Chairman Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, assailed Beauvais for pleading ignorance instead of answering a series of questions, especially after the EPA official said he did not know why EPA “sat on” Del Toral’s initial findings for almost one year.

“Why don’t we fire the whole lot of them?” Chaffetz asked. “What good is the EPA if they’re not going to [publicize that information]?”He said the panel’s focus on EPA shortcomings was not meant to “excuse” what happened at the state, county or city level, but merely a result of the committee’s jurisdictional limits. He added issues had been “festering at the EPA for a long time.”

He said the panel’s focus on EPA shortcomings was not meant to “excuse” what happened at the state, county or city level, but merely a result of the committee’s jurisdictional limits. He added issues had been “festering at the EPA for a long time.”

Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., said it was “despicable” EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy did not visit Flint personally before Tuesday. He said there was plenty of blame to go around, but “some of that blame should go to the EPA, and it should go to the head honcho.” He also brought up one of EPA’s previous failures.

“This is the same EPA that knew about what was going to happen in the mine blowout in Colorado,” Gosar said.

Some in Congress are looking for a far greater federal response. An amendment to the Energy Policy and Modernization Act introduced on Tuesday by lawmakers from Michigan would give the Environmental Protection Agency up to $400 million in emergency funding to hire new employees and contractors in response to the crisis, as well as to provide grants to replace piping in Flint. It would also require the EPA to warn citizens across the country of unsafe lead levels “if a state fails to do so.”

Members of both parties promised to ensure proper punishment for anyone involved in the crisis.

“I don’t care if it’s EPA, if it’s local, if it’s state,” said the committee’s ranking member, Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md. “I want everyone that’s responsible for this fiasco held accountable.”

Asked after the hearing if more EPA employees should be fired, Chaffetz said some workers should potentially face jail time for falsifying records and withholding information.

“I hope the Department of Justice is taking a look at it,” Chaffetz said.

 

Policy fights, funding battles still pose shutdown threat

Policy fights, funding battles still pose shutdown threat

 Nov 4, 3:26 AM (ET)

By ANDREW TAYLOR

(AP) In this photo taken Oct. 20, 2015, Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y. talks to media on…
Full Image

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite a broad budget deal, the White House and congressional Republicans must resolve dozens of policy issues and spending fights if they are to avoid a holiday season government shutdown.

Hot-button battles over Planned Parenthood, the environment and money for agencies like the IRS could still derail a must-do spending bill to keep the government running.

The goodwill that emerged from the bipartisan budget-and-debt bill that President Barack Obama signed into law on Monday could be short-lived as GOP leaders look first to sooth the feelings of rank-and-file Republicans opposed to the underlying budget pact. GOP leaders like Speaker Paul Ryan appear to be under pressure to show some fight and avoid getting steamrolled by Democrats and Obama, who bring plenty of leverage to the talks.

Filling in the details of $66 billion in additional spending for the Pentagon and domestic agencies — and sorting out dozens of policy battles — give a divided, dysfunctional Congress plenty of chances to stumble.

Continue reading “Policy fights, funding battles still pose shutdown threat”

Warning of Looming Shutdown, Lawmakers Look to Boost Agencies’ Budget Certainty

Warning of Looming Shutdown, Lawmakers Look to Boost Agencies’ Budget Certainty

Sen. Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., has often floated a proposal to move to biennial budgeting.
Sen. Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., has often floated a proposal to move to biennial budgeting. Tim Goessman / AP

As some lawmakers warned the recent budget deal has not yet staved off a government shutdown, others on Wednesday looked to reform the budgeting process in the long term.

Federal agency planners spend a disproportionate amount of their time preparing for various budget contingencies, senators said during a Budget Committee hearing, instead of conducting more mission-critical work. The current system is broken, expert witnesses and members of both parties agreed, leading to less transparency and oversight of federal spending.

The committee held the hearing to review an oft-floated proposal from its chairman, Sen. Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., to move to biennial budgeting. After approving a two-year measure setting top-line spending, Enzi’s bill would require lawmakers to pass half of the 12 appropriations each year. The more controversial spending bills would be reserved for non-election years.

 

Continue reading “Warning of Looming Shutdown, Lawmakers Look to Boost Agencies’ Budget Certainty”

GOP readying for end-of-year spending fights

GOP readying for end-of-year spending fights

Angered by Democratic success in the recent budget deal, Republican aim for policy wins in year-end spending package.

By BURGESS EVERETT and SEUNG MIN KIM 11/05/15 05:15 AM EST

151104_senate_gop_2_gty_1160.jpgSenate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, joined by, from left, Sen. Roy Blunt, Sen. John Thune and Senate Minority Whip John Cornyn during a Capitol Hill press conference. | Getty

Republicans are threatening to jam Democrats with controversial policy riders in December on everything from Dodd-Frank rollbacks to curbs on the Environmental Protection Agency’s powers, hoping to get revenge on a minority that’s spent the past week gloating over a bipartisan budget deal.

With Congress facing a Dec. 11 deadline to pass a year-end spending bill, the drama will focus on GOP attempts to slip significant policy changes into the omnibus package at the eleventh hour and force congressional Democrats and President Barack Obama to swallow them. Republicans are looking past deal-breakers like defunding Planned Parenthood or blocking Obama’s immigration actions, shifting instead to more granular policies they think Democrats could be forced to accept.
“Democrats insisting that there not be policy riders is … a big mistake,” said Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.). “There’s never been an omnibus bill that didn’t have policy riders. This bill will have policy riders in it, and I think it’s only a process of seeing how many and how far they go.”

Continue reading “GOP readying for end-of-year spending fights”