Navy to cut more than 3,000 shipyard workers

Navy to cut more than 3,000 shipyard workers

Jan. 25, 2013 – 11:55AM   |
By SEAN REILLY   |   Comments
The Navy will cut more than 3,000 employees - almost 10 percent - from its shipyard workforce through a civilian hiring freeze and by laying off temporary workers, Adm. Jonathan Greenert, chief of naval operations, said in a Thursday memo.
The Navy will cut more than 3,000 employees – almost 10 percent – from its shipyard workforce through a civilian hiring freeze and by laying off temporary workers, Adm. Jonathan Greenert, chief of naval operations, said in a Thursday memo. (Thomas Brown / Staff)

The Navy will cut more than 3,000 employees — almost 10 percent — from its shipyard workforce through a civilian hiring freeze and by laying off temporary workers, Adm. Jonathan Greenert, chief of naval operations, said in a Thursday memo.

In the face of a potentially stiff funding shortfall this year, the Navy also plans to cancel all aircraft depot maintenance from April through September, halt the bulk of surface ship upkeep at private shipyards, and reduce spending on information technology support, conferences and travel, Greenert told flag officers and top executives in the memo. Also on the chopping block: repair and modernization of most piers, runways, buildings and other facilities through the end of fiscal 2013 in September.

The Navy’s four active shipyards are in Virginia, Hawaii, Maine and Washington state. Continue reading “Navy to cut more than 3,000 shipyard workers”

AP: Sequestration means mass furloughs in April

AP: Sequestration means mass furloughs in April

Jan. 25, 2013 – 03:57PM   |
By STEPHEN LOSEY   |   Comments

The Pentagon is planning to furlough hundreds of thousands of civilian employees beginning in April if a deal is not struck to avert sequestration, according to an Associated Press report.

The AP said that Deputy Defense Secretary Ash Carter told reporters Friday that if sequestration’s budget cuts go into effect as scheduled on March 1, employees will be furloughed one day per week between April and Sept. 30, the end of fiscal 2013. The AP reported that Carter said the furloughs would likely save $5 billion.

The Army also on Jan. 22 officially froze civilian hiring and ordered managers to lay off temporary employees and let term employees’ appointments lapse once they expire. Thomas Lamont, the Army’s assistant secretary for manpower and reserve affairs, said in a memo that day that the Army may not extend any job offers. Firm job offers extended before Jan. 22 will be honored as long as an entry-on-duty date had been set. Continue reading “AP: Sequestration means mass furloughs in April”

Spending cuts to hit DFAS next week

Spending cuts to hit DFAS next week

Jan. 23, 2013 – 04:19PM   |
By STEPHEN LOSEY   |   Comments
 DFAS Director Terri McKay said more stringent actions, such as furloughing employees, may be necessary if sequestration takes place or the current continuing resolution expires without another agreement in place to further fund the Defense Department.
DFAS Director Terri McKay said more stringent actions, such as furloughing employees, may be necessary if sequestration takes place or the current continuing resolution expires without another agreement in place to further fund the Defense Department. (Defense Department)

The Defense Finance and Accounting Service on Jan. 27 will freeze hiring, stop nominating employees for performance awards, and slash travel, training and overtime to help it deal with budget cuts.

In a Jan. 17 email obtained by Federal Times, DFAS Director Terri McKay said more stringent actions — such as furloughing employees — may be necessary if sequestration takes place or the current continuing resolution expires without another agreement in place to further fund the Defense Department. Continue reading “Spending cuts to hit DFAS next week”

Fiscal cliff deal: No comfort to feds

Fiscal cliff deal: No comfort to feds

Jan. 7, 2013 – 07:22AM   |

By STEPHEN LOSEY and SEAN REILLY   |   Comments
 Echoing the sentiments of other Congressional Republicans, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., signaled in an opinion piece posted on Yahoo News' website last week that the GOP will use the looming debt ceiling showdown to shrink spending.
Echoing the sentiments of other Congressional Republicans, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., signaled in an opinion piece posted on Yahoo News‘ website last week that the GOP will use the looming debt ceiling showdown to shrink spending. (AFP)

The fiscal cliff deal, struck last week, delayed steep sequestration budget cuts for two months, but it does virtually nothing to solve the major problems facing federal employees.

Instead, it sets the stage for a series of new “cliffs” within the next couple of months: a needed increase in the nation’s debt ceiling by late February; steep sequestration budget cuts due to hit March 1; and the March 27 expiration of the current government spending bill. Continue reading “Fiscal cliff deal: No comfort to feds”

Fiscal cliff negotiators take aim at COLA adjustments, sources say

Fiscal cliff negotiators take aim at COLA adjustments, sources say

Dec. 12, 2012 – 05:38PM   |
By STEPHEN LOSEY

Rep. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., said he hasn't heard about any proposals specifically targeting federal employees being discussed during President Obama's fiscal cliff negotiations with House Speaker John Boehner.

Rep. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., said he hasn’t heard about any proposals specifically targeting federal employees being discussed during President Obama’s fiscal cliff negotiations with House Speaker John Boehner. (Brendan Hoffman / Getty Images)

Federal employee groups fear that a change in the way the government sets cost-of-living adjustments is growing increasingly likely to be part of a deal to avoid sequestration.

The new method of determining the Consumer Price Index, called the chained CPI, would lower the COLAs for federal retirees’ pensions, as well as Social Security benefits, military pensions, and other indexed portions of the government’s budget. The change would at first only mean a few hundred dollars less per year for federal retirees. But it would compound over the years and decades until eventually, retirees would likely earn tens of thousands of dollars less than they would under the current method of setting COLAs. Continue reading “Fiscal cliff negotiators take aim at COLA adjustments, sources say”