Political Perceptions: Poll Points to Risks for Romney

Political Perceptions: Poll Points to Risks for Romney

By Aaron Zitner, Associated Press

  • The Wall Street JournalSeptember 19, 2012, 9:08 AM

Mitt Romney campaigns in the rain at Lake Erie College in Painesville, Ohio,               Friday, Sept. 14, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

Which voters are causing the most trouble for Mitt Romney?

 The new Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll, released Tuesday evening, shows Mr. Romney trailing President Barack Obama — perhaps dangerously so, given the shrinking pool of undecided voters. But it also points to ways that Mr. Romney could be winning, if only he could hold on to some big voting groups that have supported him more firmly in the past.

Take a look at white voters with college educations. They make up about a third of all voters, and they’ve been open to supporting the Republican nominee at various points this year. But lately, they’ve been backing away, contributing to Mr. Romney’s currently lagging position in the race. Mr. Romney trails Mr. Obama by five percentage points among all likely voters, with 45% support, compared with the president’s 50%.

In May, Mr. Romney had a 13-point lead among college-educated whites. But his position has steadily deteriorated. This month, Mr. Romney actually trails the president by two percentage points among white college graduates—the third straight month in which Mr. Romney has sunk to just about parity.

Mr. Romney’s failure to build a stronger position among these voters is significant. Given the president’s commanding lead among minority voters, Mr. Romney has to build big margins among other large demographic groups. Continue reading “Political Perceptions: Poll Points to Risks for Romney”

Thousands of striking Chicago teachers rally in labor show of force, despite tentative deal

Thousands of striking Chicago teachers rally in labor show of force, despite tentative deal

 (Sitthixay Ditthavong/ Associated Press ) – Teachers from Wisconsin and Minnesota join striking Chicago teachers during a rally Saturday, Sept. 15, 2012, in Chicago. Union president Karen Lewis reminded the crowd that although there is a “framework” for an end to their strike, they still are on strike.

By Associated Press, Published: September 14 | Updated: Saturday, September 15, 4:36 PM

CHICAGO — Thousands of striking Chicago public school teachers and their allies packed a city park Saturday in a boisterous show of force as union leaders and the district tried to work out the details of an agreement that could end a week-long walkout.

Pushing strollers, toting signs and towing wagons of children, thousands of red-shirted teachers cheered and chanted as speaker after speaker urged them to stand firm until they have a deal in writing. They told the teachers that their strike was a symbol of hope for public teachers and other unions that have been losing ground around the nation.

“I’m pretty confident that something will come together that both sides will agree on,” said Ramses James, a sixth-grade math teacher. “I believe this is a very strong turning point when you have so many people coming out to fight alongside (the teachers union). That means a lot.”

Court Strikes Down Wisconsin Collective Bargaining Law

NPR

September 14, 2012;by Eyder Peralta

The controversial law that curbed the collective bargaining rights of public employees in Wisconsin has been struck down by Dane County Circuit Judge Juan Colas.

The law, if you remember, was championed by Gov. Scott Walker and it unleashed massive protests and even led to Democratic law makers to flee the state to forestall its passage. After it became law, union activists mobilized and triggered a recall vote, which Walker ultimately defeated.

The Associated Press reports:

“Dane County Circuit Judge Juan Colas ruled Friday that the law violates both the state and U.S. Constitution and is null and void. The ruling comes after a lawsuit brought by the Madison teachers union and a union for Milwaukee city employees.

“Walker spokesman Cullen Werwie says he is confident the decision will be overturned on appeal.

“It was not clear if the ruling means the law is immediately suspended. The law took away nearly all collective bargaining rights from most workers and has been in effect for more than a year.”

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that this means municipal workers return to what was the status-quo before the law was passed. State employees still have to abide by the new law.

“The ruling means that, unless it is overturned on appeal, school districts and local officials will have to return to the bargaining table with their workers in a much more significant way,” the Sentinel reports.

Contract issues in the Chicago teachers strike

politics

Contract issues in the Chicago teachers strike

The Associated Press | September 13, 2012 07:57 AM EST |


As Chicago teachers walk the picket lines, their union and the city’s school district resumed negotiating a new contract that includes bigger salaries, more benefits, revised job security measures and revamped teacher evaluations. Thursday is the fourth day of the strike. Here is a breakdown of the issues on the table:

TEACHER EVALUATIONS: The union is particularly concerned about a new teacher evaluation system, arguing it would be unfair because it relies too heavily on students’ standardized test scores and does not take into account external factors that affect performance, including poverty, violence and homelessness. They argue it could result in 6,000 teachers losing their jobs within two years. The district says the union already agreed to the new evaluation system, but it has offered to make adjustments. Continue reading “Contract issues in the Chicago teachers strike”

Moody’s issues ‘fiscal cliff’ warning

Moody’s issues ‘fiscal cliff’ warning

A sign for Moodys is seen. | AP Photo

Moody’s could lower the credit rating for to U.S. to Aa1. | AP Photo

By SEUNG MIN KIM | 9/11/12 10:11 AM EDT

The United States could risk losing its top-notch credit rating if Congress fails to reach a deal on the year-end fiscal cliff, one of the three major ratings agencies warned Tuesday.

Moody’s Investor Service said how the negotiations shake out on the fiscal cliff — — talks that are now all but certain to come in the post-election, lame-duck session on Capitol Hill — will “likely” determine whether the agency retains its AAA rating for the United States. Continue reading “Moody’s issues ‘fiscal cliff’ warning”