Defense Begins Delivering Furlough Notices

Defense Begins Delivering Furlough Notices

An aerial view of the Pentagon.
An aerial view of the Pentagon. Defense Department file photo

Defense Department civilians on Tuesday began to receive furlough notices informing them of mandatory unpaid days off beginning in early July and running through the end of the fiscal year on Sept. 30.

The notices will be followed by a seven-day response period, during which employees can reply to officials regarding the proposed furloughs. A Defense spokeswoman told Government Executive that the notices were hand-delivered by supervisors “to the greatest extent possible,” but that mail and email would be used as possible options as well. She said furlough notices would be delivered to employees through June 5. Continue reading “Defense Begins Delivering Furlough Notices”

Who Is Subject to Defense Furloughs?

Who Is Subject to Defense Furloughs?

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has strived for a unified a departmentwide policy on civilian furloughs, even though individual services have argued for agency-specific guidance and exemptions.

When Hagel earlier this month reduced the number of mandatory days of unpaid leave at his department, he said he came to his decision by keeping “fairness” in mind.

Still, the new plan added to the growing list of positions that are exempt from the workweek cuts. Details are available in a memo sent to managers on May 14. Continue reading “Who Is Subject to Defense Furloughs?”

The Furloughs That Never Came

The Furloughs That Never Came

 Education Secretary Arne Duncan recently said furloughs would be unnecessary at his department, after threatening them in February.
Education Secretary Arne Duncan recently said furloughs would be unnecessary at his department, after threatening them in February. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

As recently as February, just weeks before sequestration was set to go into effect, nearly every Cabinet-level department had issued warnings of the need to furlough employees in fiscal 2013 due to the across-the-board cuts.

With the fiscal year more than halfway over, however, the number of agencies and department that will in fact require furloughs has dropped dramatically. While some departments, such as Labor and Treasury, have already begun or are moving forward with plans to furlough, the Agriculture, Education, Homeland Security, Justice and Transportation departments have reversed course.

In cancelling the unpaid leave, agencies have cited a variety of factors, from congressionally approved reprogramming of funds to simply finding the requisite savings elsewhere. Continue reading “The Furloughs That Never Came”