Expect Sequestration to Hit Much Harder in 2014, Report Says

Expect Sequestration to Hit Much Harder in 2014, Report Says

USDA was able to avoid furloughing meat inspectors in 2013.
USDA was able to avoid furloughing meat inspectors in 2013. Michael A. Mariant/AP file photo

Less severe cuts, deferred costs and temporary solutions mitigated sequestration’s effect in its inaugural year, but will not help lessen the impact in 2014, according to a new report.

The Center for American Progress, a liberal think tank, said the tactics federal agencies used to reduce furloughs in fiscal 2013 are, in many cases, no longer available. In fact, they will largely accentuate the severity of the cuts this time around.

For example, Congress allowed the Federal Aviation Administration to move funds from an account meant to provide maintenance to airports nationwide to avoid furloughs of air traffic controllers that would have delayed flights. Similar budgetary “gimmicks” were employed at the Agriculture Department to stave off furloughs of meat inspectors and by the Justice Department, which has already announced plans of 10 furlough days for FBI agents in 2014.

Continue reading “Expect Sequestration to Hit Much Harder in 2014, Report Says”

What to Expect When You’re Expecting a Shutdown

The Wall Street JournalWhat to Expect When You’re Expecting a Shutdown

European Pressphoto Agency U.S. Marines march in review during the POW/MIA Recognition Day Ceremony at the Pentagon in Arlington, Va., this month.

Originally published on Sept. 24 and subsequently updated.

As the U.S. nears an Oct. 1 deadline for a partial government shutdown, the Office of Management and Budget has directed federal agencies to prepare contingency plans should a shutdown occur. Here, we tell you what to expect from a partial temporary shutdown, drawing on agencies’ plans and information from the last time the government shut down in 1995 and 1996.

We will update this list as more information becomes available.

How will travel and transportation be affected?

Agence France-Presse/Getty Images
An US Airways Airbus A320 airplane takes off from a runway at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport.

Air traffic control is expected to continue, in addition to airport and airplane safety inspections.  All Federal Highway Administration activities will also continue. Continue reading “What to Expect When You’re Expecting a Shutdown”

Senate Bill Upholds Pay Freeze

Senate Bill Upholds Pay Freeze

Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md.
Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP File Photo

Federal employees will not receive an across-the-board pay increase for 2013 under the Senate bill to keep the government open through the end of the fiscal year.

The Senate Appropriations Committee late Monday night unveiled its continuing resolution to avoid a government shutdown after the current funding measure expires on March 27. It includes a provision, also in the House-passed CR, that maintains the current pay freeze for federal employees and lawmakers through Dec. 31, 2013. Continue reading “Senate Bill Upholds Pay Freeze”

House GOP Spending Plan Continues Sequester, Federal Pay Freeze

House GOP Spending Plan Continues Sequester, Federal Pay Freeze

J. Scott Applewhite/AP

A Republican lawmaker has included an extension to the federal pay freeze in a proposal to fund government and avoid a shutdown after March 27, when the current appropriations agreement runs out.

House Appropriations Committee Chairman Rep. Hal Rogers, R-Ky., maintained sequestration-level spending in the bill to fund government through Sept. 30, with exceptions for the Defense and Veterans Affairs departments, and several additional agencies and programs. Continue reading “House GOP Spending Plan Continues Sequester, Federal Pay Freeze”

Sequestration Watch: Potential agency-by-agency impacts of across-the-board cuts

Sequestration Watch: Potential agency-by-agency impacts of across-the-board cuts

  • December 14, 2012

Details are scarce on how the across-the-board budget cuts set to kick in on Jan. 2, 2013, would affect jobs at specific agencies. But some indications are trickling in. We have compiled a list of possible implications, should Congress and President Obama fail to reach a deficit reduction agreement in time to avoid the sequester. Some of the predictions are based on information from agencies, others are from outside groups analyzing the situation. We will update the list as more information becomes available. Please use the comment section below to let us know if you have additional information about your agency.

Commerce Department: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association could face the loss of 2,500 jobs in weather and satellite programs. 10,780 new jobs in water infrastructure would be threatened.

Defense Departments: The department is in the early stages of planning. Civilians could face furloughs and a hiring freeze.

Education Department: Furloughs are possible, according to Secretary Arne Duncan.

Federal Aviation Administration: As many as 2,200 air traffic controllers could be furloughed.

Federal courts: 20,000 employees could be furloughed for 16 days.

Homeland Security Department: 24,500 jobs could be slashed.

Justice Department: Possible five-week furloughs for FBI employees. 7,500 positions could be eliminated.

NASA: 20,500 contractors could lose their jobs.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission: Has ruled out furloughs or salary cuts.

Social Security Administration: Employees could be furloughed for two to three weeks.

Veterans Affairs Department: Mostly exempt from sequestration.

Kedar Pavgi completed the research for this report.