Federal workers falling further behind in pay, council finds

Federal Eye

Federal workers falling further behind in pay, council finds

A federal advisory group reported Tuesday that federal workers have fallen slightly further behind the private sector in pay, a trend that union leaders said they hope will be stopped by getting the government back in the habit of paying annual raises.

The Federal Salary Council, a group of union officials and pay policy experts, said that the average “pay gap” in favor of the private sector now stands at 35.4 percent, up from 34.6 percent last year and 26.3 percent in 2011.

(Kim Hong-Ji/Reuters)

(Kim Hong-Ji/Reuters)

The pay gap figure, based on data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, involves employees paid under the largest of the government’s many pay systems, the General Schedule for white-collar employees below the executive level. Pay rates under the GS system are locality-based, varying among 31 metropolitan areas, the entirety of both Alaska and Hawaii, and a catchall “rest of the U.S.” locality for everywhere else apart from foreign countries. Continue reading “Federal workers falling further behind in pay, council finds”

Report on pay comparison between federal and other workers to be released

Report on pay comparison between federal and other workers to be released

The government Friday will release its latest assessment of how federal employee salaries compare with pay for other workers, potentially putting federal pay once again in the election year debate over the cost of the government.

The Federal Salary Council will receive data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics that annually is used to determine the official “pay gap” in some 30 metropolitan zones plus other areas. While by law the figures are supposed to be used in setting federal pay, in practice the raise is determined in the congressional budget process. It already has been decided that pay rates will not increase at least until April 2013. Continue reading “Report on pay comparison between federal and other workers to be released”

AFGE Statement on The Heritage Foundation’s Recent Work Hours Study

WASHINGTON, Sept. 13, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — American Federation of Government Employees National President J. David Cox today issued the following statement in response to The Heritage Foundation‘s report on public and private sector work hours.

“The Heritage Foundation has found yet another opportunity to manipulate data in order to pit the public against government workers. Its recent ‘report’ is utterly misleading in claiming that public sector employees work fewer hours than those in the private sector. The differences Heritage cite evaporate if one adjusts for firm size and length of service – the two most important factors determining hours of work and paid time off. Continue reading “AFGE Statement on The Heritage Foundation’s Recent Work Hours Study”

Who Is The Smallest Government Spender Since Eisenhower? Would You Believe It’s Barack Obama?

Who Is The Smallest Government Spender Since Eisenhower? Would You Believe It’s Barack Obama?

It’s enough to make even the most ardent Obama cynic scratch his head in confusion.

Amidst all the cries of Barack Obama being the most prolific big government spender the nation has ever suffered, Marketwatch is reporting that our president has actually been tighter with a buck than any United States president since Dwight D. Eisenhower.

Who knew?

Check out the chart –

So, how have the Republicans managed to persuade Americans to buy into the whole “Obama as big spender” narrative?

It might have something to do with the first year of the Obama presidency where the federal budget increased a whopping 17.9% —going from $2.98 trillion to $3.52 trillion. I’ll bet you think that this is the result of the Obama sponsored stimulus plan that is so frequently vilified by the conservatives…but you would be wrong. Continue reading “Who Is The Smallest Government Spender Since Eisenhower? Would You Believe It’s Barack Obama?”

How ‘Government’ Became A Dirty Word

How ‘Government’ Became A Dirty Word

by NPR Staff; September 1, 2012

 President Ronald Reagan and his wife, Nancy Reagan, in the inaugural parade in Washington, D.C., in January 1981. In his speech after being sworn in, Reagan called government "the problem."

Enlarge APPresident Ronald Reagan and his wife, Nancy Reagan, in the inaugural parade in Washington, D.C., in January 1981. In his speech after being sworn in, Reagan called government “the problem.”

The message at the GOP convention this week was clear: Government is too big, too expensive, and it can’t fix our economic problems.

“The choice is whether to put hard limits on economic growth, or hard limits on the size of government. And we choose to limit government,” said Republican vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan.

There’s nothing new about the message. Anti-big government sentiment is practically part of the American DNA, and it has deep roots in the Republican Party. Continue reading “How ‘Government’ Became A Dirty Word”