Boehner, Mikulski among omnibus winners

January 17, 2014, 06:00 am

Boehner, Mikulski among omnibus winners

 

By Erik Wasson

The Senate’s approval Thursday night of a $1.1 trillion omnibus spending bill finally put to bed the government’s budget for 2014. 

 

Winners

Rep. Hal Rogers (R-Ky.)

The biggest winner of the omnibus is the appropriations chairman who negotiated it and was rewarded with 359 votes on the floor.

Rogers opposed October’s government shutdown and has long argued winning conservative policy goals in a divided government is better achieved through negotiation rather than threats. With the omnibus, he has proof.  Continue reading “Boehner, Mikulski among omnibus winners”

Budget deal now has enough votes to pass Senate

The Fix

Budget deal now has enough votes to pass Senate

Senate Majority Leader Harry M. Reid (D-Nev.) appears to have the votes needed to push a budget agreement over the finish line. (AP)
Senate Majority Leader Harry M. Reid (D-Nev.) appears to have the votes needed to push a budget agreement over the finish line. (AP)

This item has been updated.

A bipartisan budget agreement already passed overwhelmingly by the House now appears to have sufficient support to survive a key procedural test vote in the U.S. Senate later this week.

Final passage of the bill with a simple majority of senators doesn’t appear in doubt — but the legislation written by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and Senate Budget Committee Chairman Patty Murray (D-Wash.) must first clear a procedural hurdle to end formal debate and proceed to final passage.

Supporters must garner at least 60 votes to proceed to final passage of the legislation. Assuming all 55 members of the Senate Democratic caucus vote “yes,” they will need at least five Republicans to join them. Continue reading “Budget deal now has enough votes to pass Senate”

Budget agreement poised to advance in the Senate

Post Politics

Budget agreement poised to advance in the Senate

  • By Ed O’Keefe and Paul Kane December 13 at 2:48 pm
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.). (Jacquelyn Martin/AP)Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) (Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

A bipartisan budget agreement overwhelmingly approved by the House appears likely to survive any procedural challenges and ultimately pass the Senate, according to interviews with key Republican senators.

The House voted 332 to 94 on Thursday night to approve a two-year budget outline, and Senate debate is expected to begin Tuesday, with a final vote expected later next week. While the measure will need just a majority of senators to pass, it first must clear a procedural vote requiring at least 60 votes in support. The 55 members of the Senate Democratic caucus who have signaled general support for the plan will need at least five Republican senators to join them. Continue reading “Budget agreement poised to advance in the Senate”

Republicans have hurt themselves in the battle for the House. Here’s how.

Republicans have hurt themselves in the battle for the House. Here’s how.

The budget standoff that led to a government shutdown exacted a heavy toll on the Republican Party’s image. Now comes fresh evidence to suggest it has complicated the GOP’s effort to retain its House majority.

Data in the new Washington Post-ABC News poll should worry House Republican campaign strategists for several reasons, even as the election is still more than a year away and the GOP still has the upper hand overall. Below are the three biggest causes for concern.

1. A small cushion in GOP districts. Democrats hold a comfortable 48 percent to 40 percent lead among registered voters in the generic ballot test. But it’s not just the topline national numbers (which are not perfect predictors) that should worry Republicans. It’s what’s going on in Republican-held districts that should turn more heads. Republicans hold an 8-point lead in districts they control, compared to Democrats’ 30-point lead in their districts. An 8-point lead might not seem all that bad. But consider that we’re talking about all GOP districts here, the vast majority of which are very conservative and not at any risk of switching control.  What that means is that in the swing GOP seats that will decide who wins the majority, the Republican advantage is probably smaller, if it even exists. Meanwhile, Democrats, who have to play heavy defense in addition to going on offense, appear to be in the better position to buttress their incumbents. Continue reading “Republicans have hurt themselves in the battle for the House. Here’s how.”

Senate Reaches Bipartisan Fiscal Deal

Senate Reaches Bipartisan Fiscal Deal

Doug Mills/The New York Times

The House speaker, John A. Boehner, Republican of Ohio, arrived for a meeting on Wednesday morning.

By and
Published: October 16, 2013

WASHINGTON — Senate Democratic and Republican leaders on Wednesday reached final agreement on a deal to reopen the government and extend its borrowing authority into February, with votes in the House and the Senate possibly to begin in the afternoon, according to aides familiar with the negotiations.

Senate Republicans have gathered for a final review, but lawmakers have given no indication they will block it. A government shutdown into its third week yielded virtually no concessions to the Republicans other than some minor tightening of income verifications for people obtaining subsidized insurance premiums under the new health care law.

Under the agreement, the government would be funded through Jan. 15, and the debt ceiling will be extended to Feb. 7. The Senate will take up a separate motion to instruct House and Senate negotiators to reach accord by Dec. 13 on a long-term blueprint for tax-and-spending policies over the next decade. Continue reading “Senate Reaches Bipartisan Fiscal Deal”