Illinois Labor History Society’s 2012 Union Hall of Honor Awards Dinner

You are invited to the Illinois Labor History Society’s 2012 Union Hall of Honor Awards Dinner

A Salute to Labor’s Historic Heroes from the History Makers of Today

Keynote Speaker: Karen Lewis
President of the Chicago Teachers Union

Sunday, December 2nd, 4:30 PM
Nat’l. Assoc. of Letter Carriers Branch 11

3850 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago
Tickets $75 each or $700 for a group of 10. Advance reservations are required.
Reservations and ticket purchases can be made on line at our website.

To purchase tickets with a check, click here.
To purchase tickets via paypal, click here.

2012 Inductess into the Union Hall of Honor
In this 75th anniversary year of the 1937 Memorial Day Massacre at Republic Steel,
we honor a trio of militant steelworker leaders who fought for justice and democracy.
Guest presenters include Roberta Lynch, Deputy Director of AFSCME Council 31 & athor of Rusted Dreams; labor and social activist Bea Lumpkin, author of Always Bring a Crowd.

Ed Sadlowski

Ed’s Steel Worker Fight Back campaigns sought to bring democracy and progressive miitancy squarely back into his union and the union movement generally. Ed has been a notable workers’ champion for decades since.

Alice Peurala

Alice fought discrimination against women at all levels of the industry.She became the first and only woman president of a basic steel union, USW Local 65 at U.S. Steel‘s South Works.

Frank Lumpkin
Frank led the Save Our Jobs effort following the closure ofChicago’s Wisconsin Steel plant and its refusal to pay wages and pensions owed the workers. After 17 years, a settlement victory was won
Illinois Labor History Society, 123 W. Madison, Suite 905, Chicao, IL 60602
(312) 663-4107  Email: ilhs@prodigy.net    www.illinoislaborhistory.org
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Chicago teachers strike enters 2nd week

politics

Chicago teachers strike enters 2nd week

SOPHIA TAREEN and TAMMY WEBBER | September 17, 2012 08:56 AM EST |


CHICAGO — Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is turning to the courts to try to put an end to a teachers strike that’s entering its second week and has left parents scrambling to make alternative child care arrangements for at least two more days.

The union and school leaders seemed headed toward a resolution at the end of last week, saying they were optimistic students in the nation’s third-largest school district would be back in class by Monday. But teachers uncomfortable with a tentative contract offer decided Sunday to remain on strike, saying they needed more time to review a complicated proposal.

Emanuel fired back, saying he told city attorneys to seek a court order forcing Chicago Teachers Union members back into the classroom. Continue reading “Chicago teachers strike enters 2nd week”

Chicago Teachers Strike: Union To Continue Industrial Action Into Second Week

Chicago Teachers Strike: Union To Continue Industrial Action Into Second Week

By TAMMY WEBBER 09/16/12 08:25 PM ET

Chicago Teachers Strike

CHICAGO — The Chicago teachers union decided Sunday to continue its weeklong strike, extending an acrimonious standoff with Mayor Rahm Emanuel over teacher evaluations and job security provisions central to the debate over the future of public education across the United States.

Emanuel said he would seek a court order to end the strike, which he said is illegal under state law.

Union delegates declined to formally vote on a proposed contract settlement worked out over the weekend with officials from the nation’s third largest school district. Schools will remain closed Monday.

Union president Karen Lewis said teachers want the opportunity to continue to discuss the offer that is on the table. Continue reading “Chicago Teachers Strike: Union To Continue Industrial Action Into Second Week”

Teachers Union in Chicago to Extend Strike Into 2nd Week

New York Times

Teachers Union in Chicago to Extend Strike Into 2nd Week

By and STEVEN YACCINO
Published: September 16, 2012

CHICAGO — Leaders of a teachers union extended their strike on Sunday, saying they needed more time to consider a contract deal reached by negotiators over the weekend and forcing 350,000 students around this city to begin a second week without classes.

The decision, which was certain to infuriate City Hall and frustrate parents already weary from juggling day care for a week, dashed earlier hopes that hundreds of public schools around the city might reopen on Monday. It came as a setback to the union’s bargaining team, too, which felt it had secured an agreement its leaders might accept, even if it did not quell every concern voiced at protests across the city over the past week.

“I do what they tell me to do,” Karen Lewis, president of the Chicago Teachers Union, said on Sunday, after a majority of nearly 800 union leaders — the House of Delegates — opted to meet again on Tuesday rather than immediately lift a strike in the nation’s third-largest school system. “There’s all kinds of stuff that they’re concerned about,” Ms. Lewis said of the delegates’ reluctance to accept the negotiated deal. “This is the deal we got.” Continue reading “Teachers Union in Chicago to Extend Strike Into 2nd Week”

Thousands of striking Chicago teachers rally in labor show of force, despite tentative deal

Thousands of striking Chicago teachers rally in labor show of force, despite tentative deal

 (Sitthixay Ditthavong/ Associated Press ) – Teachers from Wisconsin and Minnesota join striking Chicago teachers during a rally Saturday, Sept. 15, 2012, in Chicago. Union president Karen Lewis reminded the crowd that although there is a “framework” for an end to their strike, they still are on strike.

By Associated Press, Published: September 14 | Updated: Saturday, September 15, 4:36 PM

CHICAGO — Thousands of striking Chicago public school teachers and their allies packed a city park Saturday in a boisterous show of force as union leaders and the district tried to work out the details of an agreement that could end a week-long walkout.

Pushing strollers, toting signs and towing wagons of children, thousands of red-shirted teachers cheered and chanted as speaker after speaker urged them to stand firm until they have a deal in writing. They told the teachers that their strike was a symbol of hope for public teachers and other unions that have been losing ground around the nation.

“I’m pretty confident that something will come together that both sides will agree on,” said Ramses James, a sixth-grade math teacher. “I believe this is a very strong turning point when you have so many people coming out to fight alongside (the teachers union). That means a lot.”