Back Pay Is On the Way

Back Pay Is On the Way

Abel Tumik/Shutterstock.com

The government shutdown is over and payroll is back up and running. By the end of this week, most of the federal workforce will have received retroactive pay for the 16-day shutdown.

In fact, thousands of federal employees already have received back pay to make whole the partial paycheck they got during the shutdown, which lasted from Oct. 1 through Oct. 16. The Interior Business Center, run by the Interior Department, handles payroll for 42 government agencies and 240,000 federal employees. IBC deposited back pay on Tuesday to employees directly affected by the shutdown — a week before their regularly scheduled paycheck on Oct. 29, according to a Federal Times report. Perhaps this makes up for IBC’s data entry error last month that delayed the paychecks of 40,000 employees. IBC is the payroll provider for agencies including Interior, NASA and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Continue reading “Back Pay Is On the Way”

The Shutdown’s Squeeze On Science And Health

by NPR Staff October 01, 2013 6:41 PM

This image was posted by NASA to the agency's official Instagram account.This image was to the agency’s official Instagram account.

NASA/Getty Images

In addition to shutdowns of (including Alcatraz Island and Yosemite) and the supplemental nutrition program for , the mandatory furloughs are affecting a science and health agencies. Here’s a snapshot:


The “most painful consequence [of the shutdown for National Institutes of Health] is for the clinical center, the largest research hospital in the world” says NIH Director Francis Collins. Many of the hospital’s patients have cancer, a rare genetic disease or a serious infection that hasn’t been relieved elsewhere, Collins says. But Tuesday NIH had to close its doors to new patients. “How would you feel as a parent of a child with cancer,” Collins asks, “hoping that somehow NIH and its clinical center might provide some rescue from a very difficult situation, to hear that, frankly, you can’t come, because the government won’t be able to stay open.”

More specifically at the NIH clinical center:

  • No new studies will be started. Four had been slated to begin this week, but won’t if the shutdown continues.
  • No new patients will be enrolled in any of the 1,437 studies now underway. Roughly 500of those are studying new drugs and devices, and of those 255 are looking at cancer treatments for adults and children.
  • The hospital’s reduced staff will continue to care for existing patients, but new patients will not be admitted unless the NIH Clinical Center’s director deems it medically necessary.

Meanwhile, workers will show up to feed and care for animals in NIH labs, but basic research conducted by NIH scientists there will stop. Continue reading “The Shutdown’s Squeeze On Science And Health”

Government executives could rake in bonuses as other workers furloughed

Government executives could rake in bonuses as other workers furloughed

4:25 PM, May 18, 2013   |
By Lindsay Wise McClatchy Newspapers

WASHINGTON — An elite group of federal employees is set to receive cash bonuses despite this year’s automatic budget cuts, according to a report by a Senate subcommittee.

The report showed that members of the government’s highly paid Senior Executive Service — who make up less than 1% of the federal work force — had received more than $340 million in bonuses from 2008 through 2011. The bonuses came on top of annual salaries that ranged from $119,000 to $179,000.

In a process known as sequestration, $85 billion in across-the-board federal spending cuts took effect March 1, forcing the government to slash services and furlough workers. A month later, the Obama administration froze bonuses for the vast majority of federal workers. Continue reading “Government executives could rake in bonuses as other workers furloughed”

Sequestration Watch: Potential agency-by-agency impacts of across-the-board cuts

Sequestration Watch: Potential agency-by-agency impacts of across-the-board cuts

  • December 14, 2012

Details are scarce on how the across-the-board budget cuts set to kick in on Jan. 2, 2013, would affect jobs at specific agencies. But some indications are trickling in. We have compiled a list of possible implications, should Congress and President Obama fail to reach a deficit reduction agreement in time to avoid the sequester. Some of the predictions are based on information from agencies, others are from outside groups analyzing the situation. We will update the list as more information becomes available. Please use the comment section below to let us know if you have additional information about your agency.

Commerce Department: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association could face the loss of 2,500 jobs in weather and satellite programs. 10,780 new jobs in water infrastructure would be threatened.

Defense Departments: The department is in the early stages of planning. Civilians could face furloughs and a hiring freeze.

Education Department: Furloughs are possible, according to Secretary Arne Duncan.

Federal Aviation Administration: As many as 2,200 air traffic controllers could be furloughed.

Federal courts: 20,000 employees could be furloughed for 16 days.

Homeland Security Department: 24,500 jobs could be slashed.

Justice Department: Possible five-week furloughs for FBI employees. 7,500 positions could be eliminated.

NASA: 20,500 contractors could lose their jobs.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission: Has ruled out furloughs or salary cuts.

Social Security Administration: Employees could be furloughed for two to three weeks.

Veterans Affairs Department: Mostly exempt from sequestration.

Kedar Pavgi completed the research for this report.