Feds Furloughed By Shutdown Cannot Contribute to Retirement Fund

Feds Furloughed By Shutdown Cannot Contribute to Retirement Fund

Kenishirotie/Shutterstock.com

Federal employees forced onto unpaid leave due to a government shutdown must cease payments into their federal retirement plan accounts upon entering non-pay status.

Employee contributions into the Thrift Savings Plan must come from payroll deductions, meaning employees on furlough cannot make payments into their plans. Agencies are also prohibited from matching contributions into their employees’ plans during this time.    Continue reading “Feds Furloughed By Shutdown Cannot Contribute to Retirement Fund”

Preparing for shutdown, government plans furloughs

Preparing for shutdown, government plans furloughs

Not all of government would cease to operate

By    SAM HANANEL, Associated Press

  • Updated: Friday, September 27, 2013, 12:48 PM EDT
  • Published: Friday, September 27, 2013, 7:26 AM EDT
House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, with Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., the Republican Conference chair, left, speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, with Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., the Republican Conference chair, left, speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than a third of federal workers would be told to stay home if the government shuts down, forcing the closure of national parks from California to Maine and all the Smithsonian museums. Workers at the State Department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs wouldn’t be around to process visa and passport applications, complicating the travel plans of hundreds of thousands.

These would be just some of the effects of a government shutdown that could furlough as many as 800,000 of the nation’s 2.1 million federal workers. It could hit as early as Tuesday if a bitterly divided Congress fails to approve a temporary spending bill to keep the government running.

Supervisors at government agencies began meetings Thursday to decide which employees would continue to report to work and which would be considered nonessential and told to stay home under contingency plans ordered by the Office of Management and Budget, or OMB. Continue reading “Preparing for shutdown, government plans furloughs”

No comment: Federal workers afraid to speak about shutdown

No comment: Federal workers afraid to speak about shutdown

By Emily Wax-Thibodeaux, Published: September 27 at 4:40 pm

The Labor Department headquarters, one of many federal buildings full of federal employees who aren't talking about the shutdown. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP-Getty).

The 2 million federal employees who work for the world’s oldest democracy may have a lot to say about how Washington’s potential government shutdown could affect their lives and livelihoods.

They just aren’t allowed to say it.

Federal workers have been told not to discuss the possible shutdown with the media. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP-Getty) Continue reading “No comment: Federal workers afraid to speak about shutdown”

In Focus: How Many Employees Face Furloughs?

In Focus: How Many Employees Face Furloughs?

Federal agencies decide which employees to furlough and which to keep on the job during a government shutdown. Excepted employees include workers “who are performing emergency work involving the safety of human life or the protection of property or performing certain other types of excepted work,” according to furlough guidance from the Office of Personnel Management. In other words, they aren’t furloughed. Employees who are not funded through annual appropriations are “exempt” from unpaid leave if the government shuts down.

How many employees an agency furloughs during a government shutdown varies, and tends to depend on mission. In some departments, like Veterans Affairs, most of the workforce stays on the job. At the Housing and Urban Development Department, however, the opposite is true: most employees are furloughed.

If the government closes on Tuesday because of a lapse in appropriations, roughly 800,000 civilian employees will go on unpaid leave. Here’s a snapshot of a few agencies and their workforce data from 2011, the last time agencies had to prepare contingency plans for a possible shutdown. The list of agencies and corresponding data are not comprehensive.

 https://i0.wp.com/www.govexec.com/media/gbc/docs/pdfs_edit/092713furloughexemptgraphicge.png

 

Want to contribute to this story? Share your addition in comments.

Agencies Post Shutdown Plans Online

Agencies Post Shutdown Plans Online

Agencies on Friday began posting their contingency plans online to prepare for a possible government shutdown on Tuesday, Oct. 1. If the government closes, approximately 800,000 federal civilian employees could be furloughed. Those placed on unpaid leave will receive official furlough notices on Oct. 1, if necessary.

We’re compiling a list of agency shutdown guidance as it’s posted. We’ll continue to update this information over the next few days as agencies publish their plans. The Office of Management and Budget also will link to agencies’ guidance on its website. Click here to read the 2011 contingency plans that agencies prepared the last time the government nearly shut down.

Click here to read furlough guidance from the Office of Personnel Management.

The following agencies have posted 2013 contingency plans (click on the agency name to view the plan):

Defense Department

Environmental Protection Agency

Federal Labor Relations Authority

Housing and Urban Development Department

Interior Department

Justice Department

Peace Corps

Smithsonian Institution

Treasury Department