Rest Up From the Budget Fight, Because There’s a Debt Ceiling One Around the Corner

Rest Up From the Budget Fight, Because There’s a Debt Ceiling One Around the Corner

"I doubt that the House, or, for that matter, the Senate, is willing to give the president a clean debt-ceiling increase," Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters Tuesday.

“I doubt that the House, or, for that matter, the Senate, is willing to give the president a clean debt-ceiling increase,” Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters Tuesday. Susan Walsh/AP

Don’t expect the relative fiscal peace on the Hill engendered by the budget deal to last for long. Top Republicans are already looking ahead to the next fight: the debt ceiling.

“I doubt that the House, or, for that matter, the Senate, is willing to give the president a clean debt-ceiling increase,” Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters Tuesday. Continue reading “Rest Up From the Budget Fight, Because There’s a Debt Ceiling One Around the Corner”

Cardin expresses outrage over fed worker cuts

Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md., on Capitol Hill.
Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md., on Capitol Hill. (Getty Images )
December 06, 2013|By John Fritze | The Baltimore Sun

Sen. Ben Cardin sent a letter to Democratic Senate leaders Thursday (December 06, 2013 Senator Cardin Letter to Senator Reid re Budget Agreement Federal Workers) expressing outrage over reports that a budget deal developing in Congress may include further cuts to the federal workforce — the latest member of Maryland’s delegation to push back on the possibilities of those cuts.

Lawmakers in states with a high concentration of federal employees are reacting to rumors that negotiators are considering a 5.5 percentage point increase in how much federal employees would contribute toward retirement plans. Maryland is home to some 300,000 federal workers. Continue reading “Cardin expresses outrage over fed worker cuts”

Reid rules out grand bargain

By Erik Wasson – 10/24/13 04:24 PM ET

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said Thursday he regrets being “too lenient” in previous budget talks with Republicans.

Reid said he and President Obama were too willing to compromise in talks that took place in 2011 and 2012, and that he intends to drive a harder bargain going forward.

“If you give a bully a dollar today, they ask for a dollar and a half tomorrow,” he said in a radio interview with Nevada’s KNPR. “It has taken a while for all my caucus to come to that understanding. And quite frankly, the president, wonderful man that he is, he doesn’t like confrontation and he likes to work things out with people.

”“I was too lenient. Don’t blame it all on him,” Reid added. He also ruled out the possibility that a budget conference committee convening next week will reach a “grand bargain” that would cut entitlements, raise taxes and reduce spending.  Continue reading “Reid rules out grand bargain”

Boehner to allow House vote on emerging Senate debt-ceiling deal

By Erik Wasson – 10/16/13 10:20 AM ET

Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) has agreed to allow a vote in the House on the emerging Senate debt-ceiling deal, according to a Senate source.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) were racing Wednesday to put the finishing touches on the deal ahead of Thursday’s deadline for raising the $16.7 trillion debt limit.

The draft of the Senate agreement would raise the debt ceiling until Feb. 7, reopen the government until Jan. 15 and form a budget conference to resolve the automatic spending cuts under sequestration. Continue reading “Boehner to allow House vote on emerging Senate debt-ceiling deal”

Why Harry Reid Fears a Long-Term Shutdown Deal

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| Tue Oct. 15, 2013 12:00 AM PDT
Zhang Jun/Xinhua/ZUMAPress

As the week of a possible government default began, talks aimed at ending the shutdown and the debt ceiling crisis revolved around a new wrinkle: the resistance of Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and his fellow Senate Democrats to an agreement funding the government for a longer, rather than shorter, period of time. Say what?

Why is kicking the can down the road a couple of months a better option than staving off another government-spending showdown for a half year, as Republicans prefer? It’s because the Republican plan would lock in for even longer the $1.2 trillion in budget cuts known as sequestration, which went into effect in March and which Democrats really hate. Continue reading “Why Harry Reid Fears a Long-Term Shutdown Deal”