The Really Dangerous Candidates – For AFGE Members Only

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AFGE PAC

Dear AFGE Local 704 Brothers and Sisters!

With just a few seats, the Senate could be in the control of politicians just as extreme as Paul Ryan.

We can stop them, though, if we use the power in numbers that corporate donors can’t give them.

George Allen, who referred to federal employees as “sanctimonious social engineers” in a debate over the Virginia Senate seat that he’s after, won’t make the news this week.

The headlines right now will focus on Paul Ryan, even though candidates for the US Senate like Allen or Josh Mandel or Todd Akin are just as extreme as Ryan, and they will be just as dangerous if they win.

Because right now, every tax on your pension, budget cut, or pay freeze extension that’s passed in the House is stopped by slim margins in the Senate. But after November’s elections we could see those proposals become law. Immediately.

That is, unless the candidates who will fight for the middle class have our support. We must fight to elect pro-labor candidates like Allen’s opponent in Virginia, Tim Kaine, who has worked hard for good jobs and fair pay, along with supporting tax fairness initiatives like the “Buffet Rule.”

Chip in a few dollars today and help us support candidates like Kaine, and ensure that extreme candidates don’t turn the Senate into a rubber stamp for Bush-era policies. Simply sign in with your username and password to the AFGE website to contribute to AFGE PAC quickly and easily online.

It’s no secret what the Republican Party would do if they take control of the Senate and hold on to the House. Our 2-year pay freeze wouldn’t end in December. It would go on for 10 years, taking $60 billion from worker pockets while the rich pay nothing. If they had their way, your pensions would be taxed for another $15 billion. And 10% of us would be fired.

At any given time there are dozens of bills in the GOP-majority House that target federal workers through pay freezes, unpaid furloughs, or pension taxes.

These aren’t just threats or proposals – that’s the GOP-led reality. All these measures have already passed the House. And with control of the Senate, they’d be federal law faster than you can say “Tea Party.”

But it doesn’t have to be that way. Candidates like Chris Murphy, Claire McCaskill, John Tester and Sherrod Brown have shown that they care about protecting jobs and the infrastructure that makes the United States great. And AFGE PAC is committed to putting strong candidates that are committed to tax fairness and a strong middle class into office.

Sign-in here to chip in a few dollars to the AFGE PAC. It will only take a minute, but doing so could save your pension, our livelihood, and the middle class.

You and I don’t have deep pockets or corporate accounts like most campaign donors – but we have a power in numbers that they don’t have. If we stick together we can make a real difference in this election.

In solidarity,

J. David Cox, Sr.
President, AFGE


For the latest updates on your pension, pay, budget cuts, and other news, text “NoCuts” on your personal phone to 225-568 or sign up online.

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Federal Employees Already Have Given Enough

August 1, 2012

The 2.6 million civilian employees of the federal government perform a multitude of jobs on behalf of the American people, including but not limited to, care for veterans; administration of Social Security, veterans benefits, Medicare, and Medicaid; collection, processing, and delivery of mail; border security; guarding inmates in federal prisons; ensuring the safety of the airline passengers; and enforcing law and regulations regarding public health, environmental protection, fair housing and housing for the poor, workplace safety, private pensions, wage and hour standards, and logistics, administration, repair, and maintenance of weapons and other support for our military.

Federal employees are substantially underpaid for performing this important work. Salaries of federal employees are on average 24 percent below those of comparable jobs in the private sector. Their health insurance is less generous than that provided by large firms in the private sector. Their pensions are equivalent—not more generous—than those provided to employees of large private firms. Continue reading “Federal Employees Already Have Given Enough”

Congressional pay raise in 2013?

Congressional pay raise in 2013?

Shutterstock.com

Members of Congress are on track to receive a pay raise in 2013, unless they vote against it when they return from August recess.

The maximum pay boost lawmakers are eligible for in 2013 is 1.1 percent, or about $1,900 for most. The 1989 Ethics Reform Act created the current formula, which is based on changes in private sector wages as measured by the Employment Cost Index, and automatically takes effect unless Congress votes against it, or it’s more than the pay raise given to federal workers.

It’s unlikely that lawmakers, who earn $174,000 a year if they don’t hold leadership positions, will see an extra $1,900 in their paychecks next year for a few reasons. While the methods for determining the annual pay raises of lawmakers and federal employees vary slightly, the two are tied. Lawmakers’ annual pay adjustments cannot exceed the annual base pay adjustments of General Schedule employees. (Lawmakers do not receive locality pay.) When Congress approved a two-year pay freeze for government workers beginning January 2011, it effectively froze its own pay. In fact, lawmakers have denied themselves pay increases since 2009. Continue reading “Congressional pay raise in 2013?”

A ‘Measly’ Pay Raise Is the Least of Feds’ Worries

A ‘Measly’ Pay Raise Is the Least of Feds’ Worries

Most of you have heard the news by now that President Obama will extend the current federal pay freeze until Congress passes a budget for the next fiscal year. If you’re not aware of this latest twist in the federal pay drama, then I envy you, because it means you are probably lying on a beach somewhere enjoying the last remnants of summer.

To briefly recap, the president announced Tuesday evening that he is using his authority under the law to give federal employees a 0.5 percent pay boost in 2013. But the across-the-board salary increase is contingent upon Congress accomplishing what it is apparently incapable of these days: agreeing on a long-term spending plan to fund the government. Lawmakers are on track to pass a six-month continuing resolution when they return from recess, which means that feds will have to wait until at least April for a pay increase. Of course, government workers might have to wait longer than that if lawmakers push through another stopgap spending measure after the first one expires. Continue reading “A ‘Measly’ Pay Raise Is the Least of Feds’ Worries”

New AFGE president suggests retroactive pay raise for feds

New AFGE president suggests retroactive pay raise for feds

American Federation of Government Employees president J. David Cox
American Federation of Government Employees president J. David Cox AFGE photo

The newly elected president of the American Federation of Government Employees will lobby President Obama to support a pay raise for federal employees retroactive to January 2013 if it is approved in the final fiscal 2013 budget, according a Federal Times report.

Obama announced earlier this week that he would use his authority to grant federal employees the across-the-board 0.5 percent pay raise he had proposed for 2013, but only after Congress passes a budget. Lawmakers anticipate passing a six-month continuing resolution when they return from the August recess, meaning the earliest the pay raise could take effect would be April 2013. Continue reading “New AFGE president suggests retroactive pay raise for feds”