New Poll Shows Americans Strongly Opposed EPA Shutdown, Look Unfavorably on Those Who Put Our Health and Environment at Risk

Natural Resources Defense Council

New Poll Shows Americans Strongly Opposed EPA Shutdown, Look Unfavorably on Those Who Put Our Health and Environment at Risk

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New Poll Shows Americans Strongly Opposed EPA Shutdown, Look Unfavorably on Those Who Put Our Health and Environment at Risk

WASHINGTON (October 17, 2013) – During the 16 days House Republicans held the federal government hostage to their radical agenda, they put our environment and health at risk, and most Americans didn’t like it. Almost two-thirds of Americans say they opposed the near shut-down of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and they want the EPA back on the job, according to a new PPP poll commissioned by the Natural Resources Defense Council.

“Americans count on the EPA to protect our air, water and health,” said David Goldston, director of government affairs for NRDC. “The House extremists who virtually shut down this vital work were way out of step with the American people. The public understands that the EPA is a needed guardian of our environment and health. They expect protection from pollution – and they wanted our environmental guardians back on the job.”

While most Americans oppose the shutdown, even more don’t like that furloughed EPA inspectors, suspended cleanup of toxic dumps, and delayed work on carbon pollution limits for power plants—the centerpiece of President Obama’s climate action plan. Continue reading “New Poll Shows Americans Strongly Opposed EPA Shutdown, Look Unfavorably on Those Who Put Our Health and Environment at Risk”

Patience Wearing Thin Among Those Most Affected by Shutdown

Patience Wearing Thin Among Those Most Affected by Shutdown

Thinkstock

Double Whammy

Carl Triplett, an IT management analyst at the U.S. Department of Transportation, has the dubious distinction of being doubly impacted by the government shutdown. Not only has Triplett been furloughed, but Carolina Q, the food-truck business he co-owns with his partner, has lost some of its customer base.

For Triplett, the primary problem is the uncertainty of when the shutdown will end. “Going without one or two paychecks might not be that bad,” he says, “but when you have no end in sight,” it is cause for concern. Even the promise of at least partial back pay is cold comfort, as there is no set return date, and thus employees have no idea when to expect payment.

“I can’t write an IOU to my car payments, apartment, and credit cards,” he noted.

The barbecue business has suffered as furloughed workers remain home, or at least reduce their spending. Triplett had already noticed a downturn during September—one he attributed to the end of summer vacations and the costs associated with children’s return to school—but the effect of the shutdown has been immediate and severe. Continue reading “Patience Wearing Thin Among Those Most Affected by Shutdown”

Area government workers frustrated by shutdown

Plenty of ‘real work’ isn’t getting done, they say

October 06, 2013

Mike Mikulka, a senior environmental engineer for the EPA, does yard work at his home in Crystal Lake while the governement shutdown keeps him out of work.

Mike Mikulka, a senior environmental engineer for the EPA, does yard work at his home in Crystal Lake while the governement shutdown keeps him out of work. (Keri Wiginton, Chicago Tribune)

Mike Mikulka was supposed to spend last week in Marinette, Wis., overseeing a $110 million project to clean up the Menomonee River, which is contaminated with arsenic.

An environmental engineer in the Chicago office of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Mikulka never made it to the site. He was sent home from work Tuesday, with a phone number to call to find out when he could return. The river cleanup, which is being handled by a private company, continued without him.

“Basically, it’s being done without (EPA) oversight,” Mikulka said. Continue reading “Area government workers frustrated by shutdown”

EPA to be hit hard in shutdown, could delay renewable fuel standard

Planet Ark World Environment News

EPA to be hit hard in shutdown, could delay renewable fuel standard

Date: 01-Oct-13
Country: USA
Author: Valerie Volcovici

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will take one of the biggest hits of any federal agency if the government shuts down this week, operating with under 7 percent of its employees, according to guidance issued by the agency.

Among those furloughed would be most workers at the Office of Air and Radiation, which is in charge of writing and implementing most of the EPA’s major air pollution rules. The clock would also stop, for now, on the EPA’s eagerly-awaited proposal on renewable fuel volume standards for 2014. Continue reading “EPA to be hit hard in shutdown, could delay renewable fuel standard”

Economists Say Shutdown Will Hurt, But Hard To Add It Up

by Marilyn Geewax

October 01, 2013 5:14 AM

Government workers protest the possibility of a federal shutdown in Chicago. Nearly 100 employees from federal agencies including the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Housing and Urban Development rallied in a downtown plaza Monday.

Government workers protest the possibility of a federal shutdown in Chicago. Nearly 100 employees from federal agencies including the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Housing and Urban Development rallied in a downtown plaza Monday.M. Spencer Green/AP

After weeks of wondering what would happen, Americans now know:

1. Congress missed the midnight funding deadline for the new fiscal year, triggering disruptions in government operations.

2. That will slow economic growth, at least in the short term.

But just how far the damage will go is far from clear. Economists say they can’t refine their predictions because they have no idea how long the shutdown might last or how many federal workers may be furloughed. Continue reading “Economists Say Shutdown Will Hurt, But Hard To Add It Up”