Employees, unions get further details on furloughs

Employees, unions get further details on furloughs

Flickr user Wolfgang Lonien

The Obama administration reached out to federal labor unions Friday to provide more detailed information about potential employee furloughs in the event the budget sequestration process unfolds, and the Office of Personnel Management posted answers to common questions about how the furlough process would work in practice.

In a posting on its website Friday, the National Treasury Employees Union said it had participated in a call with Obama administration  officials earlier in the day in which the officials indicated they have had further discussions with agencies about the potential sequester and “the need to engage with their unions before taking any personnel actions such as furloughs.” Continue reading “Employees, unions get further details on furloughs”

Retirement claims surge in September

Retirement claims surge in September

Mr Doomits/Shutterstock.com

The Office of Personnel Management processed more retirement claims in September than in August, after receiving thousands more applications last month.

OPM completed 12,563 retirement claims in September — the most claims processed in a single month so far this year and 1,063 more than it expected to complete last month. The agency received 11,952 new claims in September, 4,952 more than it anticipated, and 2,979 more than it received in August. The backlog now stands at 41,176 claims, down 33 percent since January. Continue reading “Retirement claims surge in September”

Retirements surge, new hires plummet

Retirements surge, new hires plummet

Oct. 15, 2012 – 08:53AM   |  By STEPHEN LOSEY

The federal government's long-awaited retirement wave is here, and it's smacking headlong into the biggest hiring slowdown in a decade.

The federal government’s long-awaited retirement wave is here, and it’s smacking headlong into the biggest hiring slowdown in a decade. ()

The federal government’s long-awaited retirement wave is here, and it’s smacking headlong into the biggest hiring slowdown in a decade.

And it’s not just retirements. Overall attrition shot up in 2011, which caused the government’s total workforce to drop by its greatest amount since the height of the government downsizing in 1999.

With no end to tight budgets in sight — and with even steeper sequestration cuts possibly on the horizon — employees worry things could break down even further. Continue reading “Retirements surge, new hires plummet”

Sequestration Can’t Touch Certain Pay and Benefits

Pay & Benefits Watch

Sequestration Can’t Touch Certain Pay and Benefits
By Kellie Lunney

Way back in August 2011, a Maryland senator explained to a roomful of his constituents the benefits of an obscure budget procedure known as sequestration.

Democrat Ben Cardin held a town hall meeting with Census Bureau employees last summer in Suitland, Md., fielding questions from nervous feds on the issues du jour and how they would affect pay and benefits. The topics ranged from the debt ceiling; the then-looming government shutdown; the civilian pay freeze; proposals to increase feds’ pension contributions; and the deficit reduction options under consideration by the congressional super committee, now better known as the failure that could trigger sequestration. Continue reading “Sequestration Can’t Touch Certain Pay and Benefits”

Health premiums for feds will increase 3.4 percent in 2013

Health premiums for feds will increase 3.4 percent in 2013

Gunnar Pippel/Shutterstock.com

This story has been updated.

Premiums for nonpostal enrollees in the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program will increase an average of 3.4 percent in 2013, the Office of Personnel Management announced Thursday. The average health care premium increase for U.S. Postal Service employees for 2013 will be 3.8 percent.

Of that increase, government contributions will rise 3.3 percent, while participants will pay 3.7 percent more in 2013. In dollars, that means FEHB enrollees with self-only coverage will pay on average $2.75 more per biweekly pay period and enrollees with family coverage will pay an average of $6.39 extra per pay period. Changes in the enrollee share of premiums vary from plan to plan. The government pays on average about 70 percent of health benefits premiums. Continue reading “Health premiums for feds will increase 3.4 percent in 2013”