Furlough Watch: Agency-by-Agency Impacts of Sequestration

Furlough Watch: Agency-by-Agency Impacts of Sequestration

  • 1:50 PM ET
  • (SEE ENTRIES IN RED FOR THOSE AGENCIES AND DEPARTMENTS NOT BEING FURLOUGHED)
Air traffic controllers will be among those furloughed.
Air traffic controllers will be among those furloughed. Mike Stewart/AP file photo

This report has been updated. 

Across-the-board budget cuts known as sequestration are having have serious implications for federal workers, as mandatory unpaid furloughs planned for hundreds of thousands of employees begin to take effect. We have compiled a list of possible agency-by-agency plans and effects. We will update the list as more information becomes available. Please use the comment section below to let us know if you have additional information about your agency.

Agriculture Department: The department will not need to furlough food safety inspectors, due to the continuing resolution bill signed March 26.  An email sent by a senior official on April 24 to employees at the Farm Service Agency said that the stop-gap funding bill passed by Congress would prevent furloughs at the agency. And the Rural Development division might escape furloughs too, meaning the whole department could be in the clear Continue reading “Furlough Watch: Agency-by-Agency Impacts of Sequestration”

House Committee Leaves 2014 Federal Pay Raise on the Table

House Committee Leaves 2014 Federal Pay Raise on the Table

J. Scott Applewhite/AP

A House spending committee has cleared two separate appropriations bills that did not include a 2014 pay raise for civilian federal employees, but did not reject the notion entirely.

The House Appropriations Committee has approved bills to fund the Veterans Affairs and Homeland Security departments, both of which leave open the possibility for civilians to receive the 1 percent pay raise recommended by President Obama in his budget proposal.

“The committee does not include requested funding for a civilian pay increase,” lawmakers wrote in both spending bills, as first reported by The Washington Post.  “Should the president provide a civilian pay raise for fiscal year 2014, it is assumed that the cost of such a pay raise will be absorbed within existing appropriations for fiscal year 2014.” Continue reading “House Committee Leaves 2014 Federal Pay Raise on the Table”

Everything We Know About What’s Happened Under Sequestration

Everything We Know About What’s Happened Under Sequestration

While the White House Easter Egg Hunt was saved from sequestration, other programs haven’t been so lucky. Here’s our guide to what’s happened since the across-the-board budget cuts took effect. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

by Theodoric Meyer
ProPublica, May 7, 2013, 8:45 a.m.

We’ve updated our sequestration explainer to reflect new developments. It was originally published on April 11, 2013.

When the annual White House Easter Egg Hunt faced cancellation this year due to the package of mandatory budget cuts known as sequestration, the National Park Service kicked into high gear. It rescued the event — held since 1878 — with money from “corporate sponsors and the sale of commemorative wooden eggs,” according to the Washington Post.

The nation’s airline passengers also caught a break last month when Congress passed (and President Obama quickly signed) a bill allowing the Federal Aviation Administration to shift some funds and halt the furloughs of air traffic controllers that had been blamed for long flight delays around the country.

But other programs haven’t been so lucky. Children in Indiana have been cut from the federally funded Head Start preschool program, and one Head Start program in Maine is being cut altogether. Furloughs have begun for employees of agencies from the U.S. Park Police to the Environmental Protection Agency. And cuts to Medicare have forced cancer clinics to turn away thousands of patients who are being treated with drugs the clinics can no longer afford. Continue reading “Everything We Know About What’s Happened Under Sequestration”

Furlough Watch: Agency-by-Agency Impacts of Sequestration

Furlough Watch: Agency-by-Agency Impacts of Sequestration

  • May 10, 2013 
Air traffic controllers will be among those furloughed.
Air traffic controllers will be among those furloughed. Mike Stewart/AP file photo

This report has been updated. 

Across-the-board budget cuts known as sequestration are having have serious implications for federal workers, as mandatory unpaid furloughs planned for hundreds of thousands of employees begin to take effect. We have compiled a list of possible agency-by-agency plans and effects. We will update the list as more information becomes available. Please use the comment section below to let us know if you have additional information about your agency.

Agriculture Department: The department will not need to furlough food safety inspectors, due to the continuing resolution bill signed March 26.  An email sent by a senior official on April 24 to employees at the Farm Service Agency said that the stop-gap funding bill passed by Congress would prevent furloughs at the agency. And the Rural Development division might escape furloughs too, meaning the whole department could be in the clear.

Air Force: The Washington Post reported that employees in combat zones, non-appropriated funds employees, and foreign nationals would be excepted from furloughs. The Post also said that further exceptions would be allowed for “safety of life or property.” An Air Force spokeswoman told Government Executive that all Air Force civilian police, security guards and firefighters would be subject to furlough “except at installations where the manning level is under 25 percent.” Continue reading “Furlough Watch: Agency-by-Agency Impacts of Sequestration”

Reimbursement for Furloughed FAA Workers?

Reimbursement for Furloughed FAA Workers?

David Goldman/AP

Furloughed employees at the Federal Aviation Administration might receive bonus vacation time, according to a statement from the agency and administration guidance.

Many FAA employees took furlough days the week of April 21, under agency orders to take an unpaid day off every two weeks through Sept. 30. Congress agreed on April 26, however, to shift funds around in FAA’s budget to ensure furloughs were no longer necessary. Continue reading “Reimbursement for Furloughed FAA Workers?”